NACCHO Model Practice

The Project

NACCHO’s Model Practices Program honors and recognizes outstanding local health practices from across the nation and shares and promotes these practices among local health departments (LHDs). Model and promising practices cut across all areas of local public health, including, but not limited to, community health, environmental health, emergency preparedness, infrastructure, governmental public health, and chronic disease.

Once practices are designated as model or promising, they are stored in the Model Practices Database so all LHDs can benefit from them. NACCHO began accepting Model Practices submissions in 2003. Since then, NACCHO has placed numerous model and promising practices in the searchable online Model Practice Database with more added each year.

Since 2003, the collection and review of submissions had largely been a manual process. LHD’s entered data through a web form which was ultimately downloaded into either a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet or Microsoft Access database. Submissions went through a two-stage content review and collaboration process, often involving four or more reviewers whose actions were coordinated by NACCHO personnel and tracked manually through a series of excel spreadsheets. Due to growth of the program, this labor-intensive process was deemed to be unsustainable and Fig Leaf Software was called in to design and implement a workflow system that would automate the submission, review, collaboration, and publication cycle.


The Solution

The National Association of City and County Health Officials engaged Fig Leaf Software to develop a dynamic form/workflow/collaboration application using web standards. We used Sencha’s Ext JS 4 javascript framework for the front-end development and Microsoft .NET/SQL Services on the back-end to create a 3-tiered REST-based architecture that positions them for future growth.

Read all the details in Steve Drucker’s Blog Article.


The Results

Sencha Architect, depicted in figure 12, enabled our development team to respond to changes in our customer’s requirements with agility as well as rapidly prototype and visualize new features. Using it’s deep integration with Sencha Cmd made it easy for us to create and post development, testing, and production builds.

Using Ext JS for the project paid off handsomely when the customer asked us to develop a level-of-effort (LOE) for porting the search perspective over to a mobile-phone form factor. Using Sencha Architect and relying on the REST-based api that we produced during the desktop app development phase allowed us to create a quick proof-of-concept using the Sencha Touch framework.

Maryland State Bar Association
Archdiocese of St. Louis